May 6, 2014
Tunisia: Landmark Action on Women’s Rights

(Source: humanrightswatch)

May 5, 2014
A Certain Medical Procedure

pulitzercenter:

We hadn’t planned on going undercover, but clearly we looked the part. Me — the 60-year-old expat gone soft around the edges; she — the pretty, 20-something local girlfriend.

When we asked the rickshaw driver to take us to Jakarta’s Raden Saleh Street, his head swiveled and he gave me a…

April 30, 2014
Social Decline & Youth Drug Addiction. This Time In Iran

wotfigo:

image

Drug addiction in Iran

The other religion

Why so many young Iranians are hooked on hard drugs

THE Islamic Republic has always had its addicts. Its long border with Afghanistan, the world’s biggest opium producer, and the Islamic stigma against drinking alcohol mean that opium and its…

April 25, 2014
Robert Neira Tracci: Subverting #immigration laws in the name of reform. Legal authority for naturalization belongs to Congress, not the president Oath of Office. via @WashTimes:

(Source: immigrationnewsdigest)

April 17, 2014
humanrightswatch:

Nigeria: Escalating Communal Violence
 Escalating violence across five states in central Nigeria has killed more than 1,000 people since December 2013, Human Rights Watch said today. The failure of Nigerian authorities to investigate the attacks or bring those responsible to justice is likely to exacerbate the cycle of violence in the conflict-prone north central region.Communal violence, stoked by competition between local farming communities and nomadic herdsmen, has plagued this region for many years and is spreading to other states in northern Nigeria.
Adding to the overall tension in the central region, a bomb explosion on April 14, 2014, killed more than 71 people and injured hundreds others in Nyanya, in the Abuja suburbs. The attack, occurring during an early morning peak period and at a usually crowded commuter motor park, appeared aimed at achieving a high casualty rate. Nyanya is in Nasarawa state, one of the states affected by communal violence, though it did not immediately seem to be connected to those conflicts.
Photo: The aftermath of a bomb explosion on April 14 that killed more than 71 people in a bus station near Nigeria’s capital city of Abuja. © 2014 Getty Images

humanrightswatch:

Nigeria: Escalating Communal Violence

 Escalating violence across five states in central Nigeria has killed more than 1,000 people since December 2013, Human Rights Watch said today. The failure of Nigerian authorities to investigate the attacks or bring those responsible to justice is likely to exacerbate the cycle of violence in the conflict-prone north central region.

Communal violence, stoked by competition between local farming communities and nomadic herdsmen, has plagued this region for many years and is spreading to other states in northern Nigeria.

Adding to the overall tension in the central region, a bomb explosion on April 14, 2014, killed more than 71 people and injured hundreds others in Nyanya, in the Abuja suburbs. The attack, occurring during an early morning peak period and at a usually crowded commuter motor park, appeared aimed at achieving a high casualty rate. Nyanya is in Nasarawa state, one of the states affected by communal violence, though it did not immediately seem to be connected to those conflicts.

Photo: The aftermath of a bomb explosion on April 14 that killed more than 71 people in a bus station near Nigeria’s capital city of Abuja. © 2014 Getty Images

April 17, 2014
When This Woman Speaks Out, You Listen

(Source: humanrightswatch)

April 17, 2014
aljazeeraamerica:

Effort to protect farmworkers from sexual assault gaining momentum 

Isabel, 30, has been working on Florida tomato farms for many years since she arrived from Guatemala. Her experience in the sun-soaked fields has brought a steady paycheck, but she has also seen co-workers experience sexual abuse and sexual violence.
“Before, we would hear about a contractor or supervisor who would take women to a private place, to the edge of the field, and we understood that sexual assault is what was happening,” she said. “Now, we aren’t hearing these stories in the same way we used to.”

Continue reading

aljazeeraamerica:

Effort to protect farmworkers from sexual assault gaining momentum 

Isabel, 30, has been working on Florida tomato farms for many years since she arrived from Guatemala. Her experience in the sun-soaked fields has brought a steady paycheck, but she has also seen co-workers experience sexual abuse and sexual violence.

“Before, we would hear about a contractor or supervisor who would take women to a private place, to the edge of the field, and we understood that sexual assault is what was happening,” she said. “Now, we aren’t hearing these stories in the same way we used to.”

Continue reading

April 11, 2014
thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
The UN unanimously approved a 12,000-strong UN peacekeeping force in the Central African Republic.
It’s now been 20 years since the genocide in Rwanda — here, Tutsi survivors pose with Hutus who victimized them, and with whom they’ve since reconciled.
Colum Lynch reports a three-part series on the UN peacekeeping failure in Darfur: 1, 2, 3.
Doctors Without Borders accused the UN of ignoring horrible living conditions of 21,000 South Sudanese using part of the peacekeeping base in Juba as a refugee camp.
Clashes in Nigeria between Fulani cattle rustlers and Hausa vigilantes left 72 dead last Monday.
Two anti-piracy consultants for the UN were shot and killed in Galkayo, Somalia.  
Abdel-Rahman Shaheen is the latest Al Jazeera journalist to be arrested in Egypt. 
Infighting among Islamic rebel groups in Syria leaves 51 dead.
Drought looms in Syria.
American anti-tank weaponry shows up in Syrian rebel hands.
Dutch Jesuit priest Frans van der Lugt, who refused to evacuate Syria, where he lived for decades, was assassinated by a gunman outside his home in Homs. 
Netanyahu ordered his cabinet to cut communications with their Palestinian counterparts after Palestine requested to sign on to 15 international conventions. 
Iran’s Revolutionary Guard say they have captured a number of foreign agents entering from Iraq with intentions to carry out bombings and assassinations. 
Iran named Hamid Aboutalebi as its UN envoy — a provocative choice because Aboutalebi was a member of the student group who held Americans hostage in 1979 (although he was not himself directly involved in the event).
As last weekend’s votes in Afghanistan continue to be tallied, Ashraf Ghani and Abdullah Abdullah appear to be competing for the lead. A record number — 7 million people — turned out to vote. 
The Afghan government has begun an investigation into why a security officer, now in custody, killed AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus and wounded reporter Kathy Gannon.
A bomb on a stationary train in western Pakistan killed 14 on Tuesday.
22 were killed in a blast in Islamabad on Wednesday.
Pakistan plans to release 13 Taliban prisoners as part of peace negotiations. 
A new art project in Pakistan gives a face to civilian drone strike victims.
The Pakistani Taliban launched a website (link is to a news report, not to the actual website).
A Marine shot and killed another Marine at Camp Lejeune on Tuesday afternoon at the base’s main gate. 
Mexican self-defense groups refuse to disarm.
Pro-Russian violence leaks into Eastern Ukraine. 
An infographic on Eastern Ukrainian separatist movements.
The Washington Post on the special relationship between special operations and the FBI. 
Britain is increasing exercising its power to strip citizenship from suspected terrorists without prior court involvement — and then, of course, some of them end up getting killed in drone strikes.
The US is three years behind in the reports it is by law supposed to issue on potential sanctions violators. 
FBI investigation shows that Russia failed to provide some critical intelligence to the US about Tamerlan Tsarnaev.
Lawyers for Guantánamo prisoner Shaker Aamer are seeking his release on the grounds of failing health.
Alan Gross, the US contractor imprisoned in Cuba for the past four years, has gone on hunger strike.
According to further Snowden leaks, the US spied on groups like Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International (not particularly surprising, given historical record here).
Popular Mechanics rounds up a couple of military escalations you haven’t been hearing about. 
Roughly 5% ($500m) of the US defense budget will be spent developing electronic warfare systems. 
A Microsoft researcher makes the case that increased use of encryption inside intelligence agencies could rein in surveillance.
What you need to know about Heartbleed.
Hayden, the former CIA director, gets a bit sexist in his/the agency’s feud with Sen. Feinstein. 
A really awesome new invention for plugging battlefield wounds extra effectively gets FDA approval.
The Secret Service implements some internal clean-up efforts. 
Any NYC veterans reading the round-up: here are some events for free legal assistance at the end of April/beginning of May.
Some of things you shouldn’t say to returning veterans — and some of the things you should. 
Alex Horton eloquently rejects the post-traumatic stress narrative in the second Fort Hood shooting.
Photo: Zawa, Central African Republic. Anti-balaka military patrol. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters.

thepoliticalnotebook:


This Week in War
. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Zawa, Central African Republic. Anti-balaka military patrol. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters.

(via humanrightswatch)

April 8, 2014
"We have a government that says it’s okay to eat Twinkies and Cocoa Puffs and Mountain Dew, but it’s illegal to drink raw milk and eat compost-grown tomatoes and Aunt Matilda’s pickles."

— From sustainable farmer Joel Salatin. Quote captured by Amy Eddings on WNYC Culture blog. (via awelltraveledwoman)

(Source: kambui, via darkryemag)

April 8, 2014
humanrightswatch:

Italy Takes a Step Back from Criminalizing Irregular Migrants
taly sent an important message yesterday  - undocumented migrants aren’t criminals.
The lower house of Italy’s parliament agreed with the Senate to abolish the crime of entering or staying in the country without a permit.  The law dated back to 2009, when the government at the time amended the immigration code to make irregular entry and stay a crime punishable by a fine of up to €10,000 (US$13,772). The point was never to collect this kind of money from immigrants struggling to feed themselves, but rather to stigmatize irregular migrants by branding them as criminals.
The law had another intent – to get undocumented migrants out of the country. Roberto Maroni, then interior minister, openly stated at the time that the point was to circumvent the EU Returns Directive, which emphasizes that departure of undocumented migrants should be voluntary rather than coerced as a general rule - but does not apply to criminal expulsions. The Court of Justice of the European Union closed that loophole in 2011 with two different rulings involving Italy and France. Now member states are not allowed to exclude from the directive irregular immigrants who are guilty only of entering without proper documents.

humanrightswatch:

Italy Takes a Step Back from Criminalizing Irregular Migrants

taly sent an important message yesterday  - undocumented migrants aren’t criminals.

The lower house of Italy’s parliament agreed with the Senate to abolish the crime of entering or staying in the country without a permit.  The law dated back to 2009, when the government at the time amended the immigration code to make irregular entry and stay a crime punishable by a fine of up to €10,000 (US$13,772). The point was never to collect this kind of money from immigrants struggling to feed themselves, but rather to stigmatize irregular migrants by branding them as criminals.

The law had another intent – to get undocumented migrants out of the country. Roberto Maroni, then interior minister, openly stated at the time that the point was to circumvent the EU Returns Directive, which emphasizes that departure of undocumented migrants should be voluntary rather than coerced as a general rule - but does not apply to criminal expulsions. The Court of Justice of the European Union closed that loophole in 2011 with two different rulings involving Italy and France. Now member states are not allowed to exclude from the directive irregular immigrants who are guilty only of entering without proper documents.